The crafting of a headliner

With a green Bic pencil tucked back behind my ear, I picked up the saw and rained dust throughout the makeshift workbench inside Yahtzee’s main salon. Music blared in the background as I fit the next piece in my linear game of headliner Tetris, and I stood back, took a sip from a cold Rainier and admired the view.

It looked good. Better than I anticipated, to be honest. But it’s not done. Not by a long shot.

After re-finishing the wood on the main bulkhead and deciding to tackle the laborious job of replacing the old headliner, it took Jill and me a bit of time to decide what we wanted to put in its place, then how to source the material.  What we knew was that we wanted something different than the vinyl wrapped plywood that had been up since Yahtzee was built in the early 80s. It was time for that look to go.

Old headliner pealed down, ready to go.

What we ended up getting was planks of pine beadboard that have a tongue and groove fit. When investigating these, I was a bit unsure about the longevity and quality of this type of wood in the marine environment. But my research overwhelmingly suggested that other do-it-yourself sailors had been successful with it in a variety of interior applications, so I figured we’d give it a shot. Now, after working with it over the past few weekends, I’m very confident that we made the right decision. Also, a final finish of Pettit’s satin EZ Cabin Coat will provide a nice look along with a durable finish that will withstand the humidity of a boat’s interior.

In with the new.

I started the project with a test section in the starboard aft cabin and when that turned out well, the main salon was a green light. So far, I’m working in stages and have taken down and covered the entire starboard side. I’ve been impressed with how easily and cleanly the material cuts and how durable it is.

Test section in the starboard aft cabin.

Along with the new headliner, I am also taking the opportunity to install some new lighting and opted for a very low profile dome light by Lumitec that turns on and off, and from white to red, on a bezel. The first one is in, and I’m impressed with the upgrade.

Looking aft down the starboard side of the main salon.

Stay tuned for more updates as I keep chipping away at this project. It sure is a satisfying one to work on.

11 thoughts on “The crafting of a headliner

  1. Nice job, Andy!

    Perhaps you can do our boat when you come back to Seattle? Just kidding, of course.

    We always enjoy your posts – what a great experience for your two boys to grow up on a boat and sailing in Alaska.

    Cheers,
    Claus

  2. I used the pine beadboard to restore a 1970 Nomad camper I used to have, we loved it. I always wondered how it would hold up on a boat. Nice work, keep us posted
    Dave

  3. Nice creative and good looking solution. I would think curvature would be difficult – our headliner has some bends and radiuses, and plywood deals with that easily. The main cabin is some kind of stained oak ply.

  4. Wow that looks absolutely awesome Andy! Bead board would have never crossed my mind, but it looks like it was built that way. I definitely will keep that in mind for any future projects.

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