Author Archive | Saltwater People Historical Society

Kitsap II was built by Joseph Supple of Portland for the Kitsap County Transportation Co. Original photo by Roger Dudley of Seattle, archived with the S.P.H.S.©

Mosquito Fleet Monday: Kitsap II wants to race

“The Liberty Bay Transportation Co, known locally as the“Farmer’s Line” gave serious competition to Kitsap County Transportation Co. with their steamers the ATHLON, MAGNOLIA, VERONA and the LIBERTY. Warren L. Gazzam and his associates of KCTC decided to build a very fast steamer that the “Farmer’s Line” could not compete with, and as a result, an […]

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The steamer Chippewa moored in front of the Empress Hotel in Victoria. 
Original photo from the archives of the S.P.H.S.©

Mosquito Fleet Monday | The Chippewa comes to Puget Sound via Cape Horn

Once a splendid, twin stack, passenger steamship launched in Toledo, Ohio in 1900, the CHIPPEWA was designed to run as a fast commuter ship on the Great Lakes. She did so for seven years before a sale was negotiated by Joshua Green of the Puget Sound Navigation Co. with Arnold Transportation Co. Green’s partner, Charles E. […]

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S.S. SHAMROCK
Passenger and freight steamer built in 1905 at Astoria, OR
for the Willapa Bay Transportation Co.
Converted to a towboat in her later years.
In this original photo from the archives of the S.P.H.S.© she is seen near Nahcotta, WA.

Mosquito Fleet Monday: Shamrock

“Despite the challenge and weather of Washington coast north of Long Beach (served by a fleet of Columbia River steamers,) hardy vacationers flocked to hotels and summer cabins at Westport, Moclips, and Pacific Beach aboard doughty little sternwheelers like the HARBOR BELLE and HARBOR QUEEN and the steamer FLEETWOOD docking at Westport and Cosmopolis. Sternwheelers […]

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ELIZAANDERSONpc

Mosquito Fleet Monday: The ELIZA ANDERSON and Capt. McAllep

“The ELIZA ANDERSON was typical of her age and line of work, being an inland steamboat, circa 1850. Mechanically she was typical, for she was powered by a massive, single-cylindered engine that transmitted power to a pair of side-wheels by way of a diamond-shaped iron walking-beam that nodded sedately in its gallows frame atop her […]

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ALAMEDA1912

Mosquito Fleet Monday: Misfortune in the fleet

“Throughout their history, the smaller steam vessels operating on the inland waters of the Pacific Northwest displayed a rare ability to engage in sometimes spectacular mishaps with little or no injury or loss of life to their patrons. The Northwest ‘mosquito fleet’ was the victim of a rash of such misfortunes in 1912, the Puget […]

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